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 Beyoncé Takes Louis Vuitton x Supreme―and New-Mom Swagger―to the Next Level

 No one dresses for date night quite like Beyoncé, and for a night out at West Hollywood foodie destination Sushi Park with husband Jay-Z, the new mother of twins brought a bit of runway chic to a strip-mall setting. Beyoncé arrived dressed in a striped wrap dress by contemporary label Alexis with a plunging neckline, puffed sleeves, and seersucker print―and made it her own thanks to the use of several statement accessories. Layering on gold necklaces, a pair of white cat-eye sunglasses, and a logo-covered Louis Vuitton x Supreme clutch, Beyoncé added swagger to a summer style that could have seemed standard.

  Knowing how to spice up a look is a skill, but sharing an ensemble creatively on social media takes talent. And in addition to posting a pair of sultry snaps taken from across the table that night, Beyoncé gave fans an all-angles video of her outfit set to Yo Gotti’s “Rake It Up,” taking her selfie game to the next level. Her biggest accomplishment with the look, though, might have been wearing the Louis Vuitton x Supreme collaboration in a way that feels fresh. By avoiding the monogram jackets and hoodies that have been embraced by seemingly every influencer the last few weeks in favor of the stark, graphic bag, she proved that the most important accessory isn’t a must-have designer piece―it’s a fresh point of view.

  Read more at:ivory bridesmaid dresses uk | cream bridesmaid dresses



Beyoncé Takes Louis Vuitton x Supreme―and New-Mom
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From N.E.R.D to Bella Hadid―Off-White’s Virgil Abloh Talks Influences

With a home base in Chicago, a dozen stores around the globe (including a brand-new one on Mercer Street in New York’s Soho), collaborations in the works with the likes of Nike and Ikea, and fashion shows on two continents (there is talk of something “small and intimate” at his shop during New York Fashion Week), Virgil Abloh’s life is defined by movement.

Come October 12, he’ll find himself front and center at Manhattan’s Milk Studios, where he’s participating in Vogue’s inaugural Forces of Fashion conference. The Off-White founder will be sitting down with Heron Preston and Vogue’s Chioma Nnadi to discuss exactly how, in a fast-changing industry like fashion, he keeps up the cool factor―both his own and that of his brand. Hint: It helps to have Hedi Slimane, Juergen Teller, and Pharrell Williams as influences.

Naturally, Abloh was on a plane when he answered our questions about the people, places, and pop culture moments that have defined his career so far. His is the first interview in a series we’ll be posting with Forces of Fashion’s designer participants. Watch this space for more, and visit vogueforcesoffashion.com to purchase tickets.

Designer: Hedi Slimane

Hedi’s past predictions of what is and will be anti-fashionable and fashionable have proven to be spot-on, but beyond this concept, his career has exhibited how to remain strict to one’s vision and successfully lead a fashion house.

Read more at:midnight blue bridesmaid dresses | blue bridesmaid dress



From N.E.R.D to Bella Hadid―Off-White’s Virgil Abl
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artificial intelligence software to retailers

One year ago, the Madison startup Markable rolled out its signature product: an app that could take photos of dresses, shirts, handbags or heels and tell you where to buy the clothes in the picture.

Today, that initial game plan has been scrapped. Instead of using its sophisticated artificial intelligence for a consumer fashion app, Markable is now selling its technology to online fashion retailers.

"People don't like to download apps anymore," said Joy Tang, Markable's CEO. "Their phone is so full of apps already."

The original Markable app was a one-stop shop for fashionistas. A consumer could upload a photo of a clutch handbag, or a model with a snazzy ensemble, and the app would identify the products in the image and highlight similar clothes available for purchase on retail websites.

That app is now gone. Starting this month, Markable’s tech will be found on the website AKIRA, a Midwestern fashion line based in Chicago. When visitors search AKIRA’s inventory, they’ll have a “camera search” option, where they can upload an image of a piece of clothing they like and find similar items to shop through in return.

Then, there’s what Tang calls the “reverse-engineered” version of the Markable technology. When a visitor clicks on a piece of clothing on AKIRA’s shop, they’ll be able to see if it has ever been modeled by a celebrity or fashion blogger. Click on a shirt, and you may see a photo of when that same shirt was previously worn by Taylor Swift. Shoppers then have the option of “completing the look” by buying the rest of T-Swift's ensemble.

Markable also offers “visual search engine optimization” to retailers. In other words, the software automatically creates descriptions for clothing that will make the items more likely to pop up during a Google search.

AKIRA is just the beginning, said Tang. Markable is currently in talks with five other retailers. The goal, she said, is to become the industry standard for online fashion shopping.

The software Markable has developed is no small feat: When it comes to image recognition technology, clothes are among the toughest things for computers to parse. Fabric can be twisted or contorted into all kinds of shapes or patterns, making it difficult for AI to figure out the patterns.

Today, that initial game plan has been scrapped. Instead of using its sophisticated artificial intelligence for a consumer fashion app, Markable is now selling its technology to online fashion retailers.

"People don't like to download apps anymore," said Joy Tang, Markable's CEO. "Their phone is so full of apps already."

The original Markable app was a one-stop shop for fashionistas. A consumer could upload a photo of a clutch handbag, or a model with a snazzy ensemble, and the app would identify the products in the image and highlight similar clothes available for purchase on retail websites.

That app is now gone. Starting this month, Markable’s tech will be found on the website AKIRA, a Midwestern fashion line based in Chicago. When visitors search AKIRA’s inventory, they’ll have a “camera search” option, where they can upload an image of a piece of clothing they like and find similar items to shop through in return.

Then, there’s what Tang calls the “reverse-engineered” version of the Markable technology. When a visitor clicks on a piece of clothing on AKIRA’s shop, they’ll be able to see if it has ever been modeled by a celebrity or fashion blogger. Click on a shirt, and you may see a photo of when that same shirt was previously worn by Taylor Swift. Shoppers then have the option of “completing the look” by buying the rest of T-Swift's ensemble.

Markable also offers “visual search engine optimization” to retailers. In other words, the software automatically creates descriptions for clothing that will make the items more likely to pop up during a Google search.

AKIRA is just the beginning, said Tang. Markable is currently in talks with five other retailers. The goal, she said, is to become the industry standard for online fashion shopping.

PauseCurrent Time0:00/Duration Time0:00Stream TypeLIVELoaded: 0%Progress: 0%0:00Fullscreen00:00Unmute

The software Markable has developed is no small feat: When it comes to image recognition technology, clothes are among the toughest things for computers to parse. Fabric can be twisted or contorted into all kinds of shapes or patterns, making it difficult for AI to figure out the patterns.

Tang said that makes fashion one of the next frontiers for image recognition technology.

"If you can do fashion, you can do anything else,” she said.

Tang said that the company’s algorithms have come a long way in the past year, especially since they added more computer scientists to their team to enhance the software’s capabilities.

“When we launched the app last time, we didn’t have our four PhD scientists,” said Tang. “The results were not that amazing."

The technology is on a different level now, said Tang. Before, the software took 10 to 20 seconds to analyze an image. Now, it can do so nearly instantly

Read more at: modern bridesmaid dresses | beautiful bridesmaid dresses



artificial intelligence software to retailers
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